Fruit: I really like it. I always buy it. I don’t always eat it.

With the exception of berries, fruit is messy. Juice gushes everywhere while you eat it or slice it and to be honest, cutting up a mango for a snack often strikes me as a hassle when I’m on-the-verge-of-acting-like-oscar-the-grouch hungry.

Recently I’ve gotten into the habit of buying lots of grapefruits and oranges and segmenting all of them right when I get home from the store. There’s something about the monotonous motion of the knife and the lingering smell of citrus that’s downright peaceful. As an added bonus, I only have to clean up a juicy mess once. Here’s HOW you do it…

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

Homemade Fruit Cups | Darling Magazine

1. (This is the most important step.) Sharpen a large knife.
2. Cut the ends of the orange off so that it will sit flat.
3. Moving your knife in a crescent shape, cut off the rind and pith (that’s the white part).
4. (Make sure you do the rest of the steps over a bowl.) Cut into the orange at an angle parallel to the inner pith so that the flesh is released.
5. Fold the empty segments back like book pages as you work your way around the the orange.
6. When all the segments are in the bowl, squeeze the remaining pith to release any juice.

Now, here’s WHY you do it…

Submerged in citrus juice and stored in the fridge, fruits such as mango, pineapple, peaches, papaya and coconut will keep much longer than in a fruit bowl, where they can be over-exposed to ethylene. This also puts you in control; instead of waiting for fruit to ripen or rot on the counter, you can buy an assortment of fruit that is perfectly ripe and eat it together when you’re good and ready!

Best of all, you get a two-for-one: a to-go fruit cup and fresh squeezed juice. The juice can be used to make a refreshing drink (by adding agave nectar and soda water) or a light vinaigrette.

I find that 8oz canning jars (pictured) are the perfect size.

Images by Hannah Messinger

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