How do we raise our voices to address injustice in ways that promote peaceful and respectful communication?

“Next to creating a life, the finest thing a (wo)man can do is save one.”

Rosalind Franklin’s story will inspire and frustrate. And it'll make you want to tell everyone you know.

They were leaders, listeners, revolutionaries, teachers, and nurturers.

We are more than our race, religion, and political vote. But all too often we allow those glaring differences to convince us otherwise.

There’s something profoundly special about packing up a book for a fun summer vacation or a relaxing afternoon at the pool, isn’t there?

The darkest times are the ones that most demand our effort to recognize those who bear light for us.

Royalty or not, every woman has the potential to make an impact by examining her sphere of influence and choosing to make the most

To what degree we have allowed ourselves to be conditioned to conform? What does "unlearning" look like?

Some thoughts from the women who are considered the 20 most powerful in the world, according to Forbes.

The beginning of another work week — we get it. But before you succumb to the stress and the busyness that this week may hold for you, we invite you to take a minute (well, 48 seconds) to pause and notice the sheer joy on one teen’s face. When her health prevented her from attending a Florence and the Machine concert with her best friend, the concert came to her at Hospice Austin’s Christopher House instead.

We were tearing up eight seconds in. This is what it’s all about, yeah?

There are few things more satisfying than a good belly laugh. I’m talking about the deep sort of laugh that takes over your entire body. The type that forces your head to fall back, tears to stream from your eyes, while stealing your breath and rendering you incoherent; the type of laugh that physically hurts, and leaves you aching afterward. As painful as it sounds, there are few things more satisfying.

Nothing fires us up more than watching other women conquer obstacles and chase their dreams. Which is why we’ve completely fallen in love with Carly Fleischmann, a 21-year-old journalist from Canada who, even though she has autism and is unable to speak using her mouth, communicates via keyboard and just scored a pretty  big interview for her first time on camera.

Watch in full below and tell us you don’t agree: Can’t we please see more women like Carly on our screens? We absolutely love this.

Writing is a lot like like gardening. When we’re willing to get our hands dirty, the blank page becomes a space to cultivate and sustain life — a little plot for growing seeds that, when exposed to just the right slant of sunlight, blossom into nourishing fruit. But as any gardener would know, there’s an art, a cadence to growing green things: A season for uprooting, and another for tilling. Next, a time for waiting while the elements work their magic. Then, finally, the harvest.

The same rhythm rings true in growing ourselves. Thankfully, unlike actual gardening, storytelling requires no green thumb. You don’t even have to identify as a writer to reap the benefits of writing — you just have to want to do the work.

Today at Darling, we are celebrating not one, but two wins for women! Combatting ageism in Hollywood and gaining well-deserved recognition for human rights activism are both reasons to celebrate in our book.

Did you know that in some cases, watching television might actually be good for you? Yes, it is filled with programs that bombard us with unhealthy messages and stereotypes. And yes, there’s no denying that these messages can have a negative impact on our thoughts, attitudes and choices. (If you’ve read any of my previous articles, you will have noticed that I’ve raised caution about media use).

But, you may be surprised to find that at the same time, TV watching actually has the potential to do these three things:

At Darling we love when celebrities use their influence for good, saying things that resonate with who we are but that also challenge us to pursue the bigger and better, both in ourselves and in the world around us. Emma Watson is one such woman who we think totally nails the #DarlingMovement in how she carries herself and also in the way she speaks of women and of men.

So, in honor of her birthday tomorrow, here are ten of our favorite quotes that prove she has an open invite to the Darling office any time. HBD, Hermione.

There are so many ways we can spend our time waiting these days – we can catch up on emails on the bus heading to work, we can browse through our Instagram feed while waiting for our turn at the hairdresser or we can check our calendars and set more plans while waiting for a friend to join us for lunch.

These are all instant distractions that help make time pass, but rather than using our phone in this way, why are we not using these pauses to give ourselves a dose of inspiration?

We’re so honored and excited to have been featured by HLN’s Robin Meade on Morning Express! Their team visited our Los Angeles office to talk with our Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director, Sarah Dubbeldam on Darling’s mission, purpose, and cultural impact. Click here to watch the 90-minute segment and read more, below!

For those of us who feel the tug toward words and books, toward verse and ink on the page, writing may feel like second nature, like a gift. For many of us, it even feels like a lifeline—a way to uncoil our thoughts, understand our existence and connect to our truest selves.

But after our years of school end, how do we continue to grow as writers? How do we invest in this passion? Is it even worth it? If we aren’t going to write a best-seller or even make money writing, can we justify giving the craft more time and expense?

“I’m not smart,” she said, her eyes wide with pain.

I never get used to the heartbreaking words I often hear from the little brown couch in my counseling office. Labels can be difficult to peel off once they stick. We wear beliefs about ourselves like tattoos – messages about who we are that have become a part of our identity.

Intelligence is no exception. Somehow “smart” has become something that we either are or are not. It’s easy to understand how our perspective has been shaped the way it has. After all, most schools and many workplaces tend to measure and celebrate a very specific kind of intelligence. Not all of us have been given a safe place to display our particular brand of “smart.”

Long under scrutiny for her unrealistic body proportions, Mattel recently announced that Barbie will now be available in three new body sizes: petite, curvy and tall. As a “…nod to growing up girl in our culture right now,” many are wondering why it took Mattel so long to finally address concerns that mothers (and women) have had for decades.

But is this change enough? Watch the below clip and let us know your thoughts in the comments. Are we still making too big of a deal over a woman’s — even a doll’s — body? Or is this finally a step in the right direction of breaking down impossible beauty ideals?

Last year I had my first experience with Airbnb, an online community marketplace that lets you rent accommodations from local hosts in 190 different countries.

While studying abroad, I did some independent traveling and needed an inexpensive place to stay in Barcelona. I met Victoria through her listing on Airbnb, and two weeks later found myself sitting with her in her living room, sipping coffee, and speaking in broken Spanglish. Victoria taught me how to use her espresso machine, welcomed me to use her various bathroom products, and placed clean towels on top of my freshly made bed. I came and went as I pleased, sometimes inviting her along and sometimes just taking her spare key with me.

Here I was, a guest in a complete stranger’s home, with the key to every possession she owned in the pocket of my purse. This was a business transaction rooted in mutual respect, trust, and kindness. More than that, it was a business model that reflected the traditional characteristics of friendship, made possible by the amazing capabilities of the Internet.

This post is brought to you by Olympus.

Ever wonder what a day at the Darling office looks like? With the printing and release of our fourteenth issue, kicking off exciting fall events, and even welcoming a new (tiny) team member to the bunch, our days of late have been busy but brimming with newness, creativity and collaboration.

And while smartphones are great, if you’re anything like us you sometimes want certain memories to carry a bit more weight beyond the typical Instagram shout-out. That’s why we teamed up with Olympus to do just that.

A Note From The Editor: While in the past it hasn’t been our policy to promote Kickstarter campaigns on Darling, we’ve been receiving so many amazing and inspiring product pitches that we’ve decided to open the door for submissions and will be selecting one campaign to feature every quarter! If you have an upcoming Kickstarter campaign that you’d like to submit for our spring selection (March – May) please send an email to blog@darlingmagazine.org with “Kickstarter Submission” in the subject line.

We like to support each other in the magazine world, which is why we’re excited to introduce you to Whiteour friends from down under. With the goal to inspire, encourage and challenge couples to build a marriage as beautiful as their wedding day, their current Kickstarter campaign is worth watching.

Whether single or in a relationship, we invite you to learn more about White’s journey, where it’s headed next, and why anyone can stand to gain from this beautiful publication.

Highly qualified, irresistible, whip smart, and a force of nature on screen and on paper. James Bond, you ask? Hardly. We think it’s high time to give the women of the Bond films the long overdue credit that they deserve.

One year prior to Betty Friedan publishing The Feminine Mystique and Congress passing the Equal Pay Act, Ursula Andress slunk out of the Caribbean like Botticelli’s Birth Of Venus and into the public consciousness as the archetypal “Bond Girl” Honey Ryder in the inaugural film Dr. No (1962). In the 50 years of movie franchise and women’s rights history that followed, the Bond Girl remained unrivaled in beauty, confidence and charisma, and in later iterations grew increasingly credentialed.

A recent Sony media scandal (the studio’s emails were hacked and made public) showed that actresses Jennifer Lawrence and Amy Adams were paid less than their male co-stars in American Hustle. Since then, more people’s eyes have been opened to the gender inequalities that still exist in the media today. It is concerning and a bit mind-boggling that in 2015 there are still many places where the media needs to adjust their inclusivity of women.

The following will draw your attention to three places, showing why we need to see more women in movies and on television, in behind-the-scenes jobs, and cast in a wider range of occupations. Be prepared for some alarming statistics on gender inequality in the film and television idustry.

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