Intention is key with everything, right? Which is why we’re loving this Glitter Guide article about curating a home that best welcomes others and also reflects your own unique style. They had blogger and designer Amanda Risius share her process for creating a space, and we’re pumped to share her advice (and handy workbook) with you, too. Below!

Do you struggle with the process of picking out furniture or art because you aren’t sure what your style is or if it will match your current décor? Do you wish you could decorate your home beautifully with ease like the pros? The key to confidently creating a home you love is knowing your decorating style. Knowing your style will give you a plan to follow and make decisions much easier. I’m going to show you exactly how to determine your decorating style with five simple exercises.

With three degrees under her belt from Pomona College, Harvard and Stanford, calling Jane Chen an achiever is an understatement. Her incredible drive and work ethic, combined with her heart for social change and innovation resulted in her creation of the Embrace Infant Warmer.

After seeing a need for a more affordable and accessible way to save the lives of millions of premature babies without the use of an incubator, Jane sprung into action with her team of classmates from Stanford. Together under Jane’s leadership, they’ve built Embrace Innovations and Little Lotus to continue their mission to save these babies and families.

Whether we wish we could serve the poor and alleviate suffering like Mother Teresa or pioneer critical scientific research like Marie Curie, we all dream of doing beautiful, world-changing things with our lives. Yet, no matter how much we might long to follow in the footsteps of such women, who in fact believes themselves capable of that kind of greatness?

Perhaps we can imagine ourselves doing so in the future — when we are “older and wiser” — but in our present, imperfect condition? Hardly.

We recently hosted our first creative retreat in the quaint and beautiful town of Carmel by the Sea, California. The weekend was absolutely incredible and filled with life-changing moments, authentic conversation and delicious food and wine. A picturesque stone house nestled in the cliffs overlooking the ocean was where twelve vulnerable yet fearless ladies called home for four rejuvenating days.

It’s safe to say that the weekend will not soon be forgotten.

In our day and age of cell phones, email, and social media, it’s easy to overlook the art of writing handwritten notes to communicate with the people we love. We’ve expounded upon the value of continuing to put pen to paper as we send correspondence to family and friends several times, so instead of harping on the topic once again, we thought we’d share some specific instances in which it is easier to send a handwritten note than you think.

Check out our ideas below and let us know if you have any tips to share!

While we wish it were otherwise, most of us don’t have the luxury of pursuing our creative passions as a full-time job. Whether we love painting or pouring candles, writing or dancing, event planning or photography, the truth is that we don’t often make a living from those passions. Instead, we find pockets of time to shadow those desires on the weekends, the evenings, and often, when we could be sleeping. We read articles and books about our hobbies, and spend our money on the passion we love so dearly. But we aren’t waking up every morning to head to a studio or the craft room or the keyboard. Instead, we get up and work at jobs that don’t set our hearts aflame.

There were a lot of years where I bemoaned my lack of time to pursue my passion. I’m a writer at heart, a woman who comes alive with the tap of keys on the keyboard, a woman who could spend hours each day whittling down a paragraph until it sings with the vibrancy of power and precision. But for most of my adult life, I’ve been a writer in the margins, pulling out my laptop in the evenings or on the weekends, taking twenty minutes over lunch or an hour after work to finish an article or pen a chapter.

There are so many ways we can spend our time waiting these days – we can catch up on emails on the bus heading to work, we can browse through our Instagram feed while waiting for our turn at the hairdresser or we can check our calendars and set more plans while waiting for a friend to join us for lunch.

These are all instant distractions that help make time pass, but rather than using our phone in this way, why are we not using these pauses to give ourselves a dose of inspiration?

A glassware company that produces striking hand blown carafes and glasses, Bib & Sola offers a stylish and conscious alternative to plastic bottles. The brand’s founder, Kira Heuer, is adamant about reducing plastic waste and providing clean water solutions. Through Bib & Sola’s colorful pieces, she aims to do both, believing that their beauty has more power to inspire education and change than anything else — a concept she calls, “Aesthetic Activism.”

We recently had the chance to connect with Kira and learn more about Bib & Sola’s story, its Aesthetic Activism campaign, and the difference that using glass instead of plastic can make.

I was struck by this quote by my friend and Darling contributor Katherine Wolf from her newly released book Hope Heals:

I imagine most of us have fairly straightforward pictures in our heads about what our lives will look like and who we’ll become. When something happens that is not inside the four corners of that picture we view it as a detour and hope to get back on track as quickly as possible. So what happens when you take a detour and can’t ever get back to the original picture?

We’re all artists in our own way. Sometimes, we just need some help getting in the zone, especially living amidst so much distraction, noise, and technology. We’ve recently discovered Sonia Mandeville, of So Sonia on YouTube, and are smitten. She’s not your average vlogger. She’s a 17-year-old creative filmmaker, writer, and visual artist from Jakarta, Indonesia who travels the world to gain inspiration for her art.

In fact, this is what Rainn Wilson, beloved actor and founder of SoulPancake, had to say about her when we asked …

We find so much inspiration through learning about women who are leaving their mark on the world in a profoundly impactful way. From entrepreneurs and non-profit founders to artists and writers and musicians, women are paving the way in so many different fields as they pursue their passions and develop creative ways to make the world a better place.

Read on to learn about some of the women who are inspiring us lately, and leave us a note in the comments section to let us know whose life path has encouraged you.

The late Robin Williams could incite many a thrilling wonder to life. Perhaps one of his most cherished roles we remember was that of English teacher John Keating in “Dead Poets Society.”

Speaking of those that paved the way before them, Keating aimed to summon the muse for his students. He posed: “They’re not that different from you, are they? … Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they’re destined for great things, just like many of you, their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because, you see, [they] are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in. Listen, you hear it? Carpe — Hear it? Carpe, carpe diem, seize the day…make your lives extraordinary.”

International Women’s Day is meant to celebrate and encourage women to achieve their ambitions, call for gender-balanced leadership, to value differences, and to develop more inclusion and flexibility across the globe. In short, it’s meant to create room for more women to create their own kind of beauty in the world. That’s why we thought it would be inspiring to have Chelsea Neman, of LA’s Tappan Collective (which recently opened in Platform in Culver City), share her thoughts on a few women who are doing just that.

Aiming to change the way emerging artists connect with their collectors, Chelsea co-founded Tappan to support emerging artists by sharing their work through e-commerce, crafting digital contexts, and a recently-opened physical space in Los Angeles. Chelsea believes that, “artists can show people something they otherwise may never see. They have the ability to change the way we think about our lives and the world we live in. Being an artist is a brave venture, and it gives me great joy to be able to support their careers.”

Who are a few of these female artists you should know? Read on to find out.