At Darling we love when celebrities use their influence for good, saying things that resonate with who we are but that also challenge us to pursue the bigger and better, both in ourselves and in the world around us. Emma Watson is one such woman who we think totally nails the #DarlingMovement in how she carries herself and also in the way she speaks of women and of men.

So, in honor of her birthday tomorrow, here are ten of our favorite quotes that prove she has an open invite to the Darling office any time. HBD, Hermione.

We find so much inspiration through learning about women who are leaving their mark on the world in a profoundly impactful way. From entrepreneurs and non-profit founders to artists and writers and musicians, women are paving the way in so many different fields as they pursue their passions and develop creative ways to make the world a better place.

Read on to learn about some of the women who are inspiring us lately, and leave us a note in the comments section to let us know whose life path has encouraged you.

International Women’s Day is meant to celebrate and encourage women to achieve their ambitions, call for gender-balanced leadership, to value differences, and to develop more inclusion and flexibility across the globe. In short, it’s meant to create room for more women to create their own kind of beauty in the world. That’s why we thought it would be inspiring to have Chelsea Neman, of LA’s Tappan Collective (which recently opened in Platform in Culver City), share her thoughts on a few women who are doing just that.

Aiming to change the way emerging artists connect with their collectors, Chelsea co-founded Tappan to support emerging artists by sharing their work through e-commerce, crafting digital contexts, and a recently-opened physical space in Los Angeles. Chelsea believes that, “artists can show people something they otherwise may never see. They have the ability to change the way we think about our lives and the world we live in. Being an artist is a brave venture, and it gives me great joy to be able to support their careers.”

Who are a few of these female artists you should know? Read on to find out. 

Let’s take a look back. Not too far back, but to our grandmothers and great-grandmothers. There’s no doubt that life was different for them. We often say it was harder or more difficult. She was often a version of a woman similar to Mad Men‘s Betty Draper: A baby bouncing on her hip as she eagerly puts a roast in the oven before her husband, the bread winner, comes home from work. She couldn’t just order in a pizza or pick something up on her way home from her own office. Her role was to nurture and care for her family, while her man went out and earned the money.

For whatever reason, and we’ve heard many of them, women may have been told rather that than being a homemaker, a housewife, a stay-at-home mom and cook, or a strong, independent working woman, we should be flexible and proficient enough to be both. Despite new critiques that may suggest some form of weakness in a home-maker role, being strong and in control in the kitchen can make us feel like modern, empowered women.

Highly qualified, irresistible, whip smart, and a force of nature on screen and on paper. James Bond, you ask? Hardly. We think it’s high time to give the women of the Bond films the long overdue credit that they deserve.

One year prior to Betty Friedan publishing The Feminine Mystique and Congress passing the Equal Pay Act, Ursula Andress slunk out of the Caribbean like Botticelli’s Birth Of Venus and into the public consciousness as the archetypal “Bond Girl” Honey Ryder in the inaugural film Dr. No (1962). In the 50 years of movie franchise and women’s rights history that followed, the Bond Girl remained unrivaled in beauty, confidence and charisma, and in later iterations grew increasingly credentialed.