In our quest to prioritize what we “really” need in our wardrobes, we’re finding that multi-use is key. That’s why we’re grateful to the ladies of the Glitter Guide for putting together this round-up and for reminding us that more doesn’t have to — literally — mean more.

A trench coat is a classic staple that we believe should be in every woman’s closet and we’ve rounded up six ways to show you how versatile this piece can be this spring. Bring on those showers!

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I wore a pale yellow sleeveless floor-length gown with a beaded bodice.  My braces sparkled, and my hair was in a French braid.  My curled bangs were plastered with so much hairspray I was terrified someone would light a candle next to me and I’d instantly go up in flames.

This was my initiation into the world of being a bridesmaid. My mom was getting remarried and asked me to be her maid of honor. I don’t think I did any of the things a maid of honor is supposed to do. But I wore that yellow dress with conviction and stood proudly next to her on a rainy day in March in a tiny Dallas church with emerald green carpet.

A few weekends ago I was a bridesmaid for the 17th time. When I tell people how many weddings I’ve been in, the response I usually get is, “You’re like that girl in 27 Dresses.”  Outwardly, I laugh, but inwardly pray I meet someone well before being a bridesmaid that many times.

In March of 2015 fashion designer Eileen Fisher launched Vision 2020, a plan to achieve 100% sustainability in her clothing lines within five years. Her courageous ranks have since been joined by notable brands around the world; councils on ethical fashion convene in all corners of the globe to discuss progress, changes and breakthroughs.

And it’s undoubtedly a bold move to begin such a transformation from the top down. But for other designers, this ethical pursuit has been a grassroots passion influencing every stage of production. Tine Mollatt, founder of byTiMo and visionary for conscious consumerism, has sought after a holistic approach to design since 2004. Detailing each element from material sourcing to employee relations and buyer experience, byTimo crafts a uniquely tailored mission that’s deeply rooted in integrity.

With spring just around the corner, everyone’s looking for those perfect airy pieces that will sway in the light breeze. With a collection that is just that, Laili Lau‘s latest work has been influenced by the contrast of nature and modernity that she’s experienced in her home city of Caracas, Venezuela.

The young designer continues to incorporate her love for adventure into her feminine designs to create collections that embody her personality and lifestyle. We were fortunate enough to get the chance to interview Laili and discuss what’s inspired her to pursue fashion design and are excited to share her story with you, below.

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I pledge allegiance to the products of the United Stated of America. And to the fashion for which it stands, one website, under shared accountability, with variety and style for all.

If you are anything like I was when I started working in the retail industry, you don’t spend much time thinking about where your clothes come from. Take a look at that label the next time you’re out shopping. Would it surprise you to learn that 98% of clothing purchased in the U.S. is imported?

Retailers are required to disclose whether a product is Made in the USA, imported or both, and yet this information is often not readily available online or is very hard to find. I created USINMADE, a curated assortment of the best items Made in the USA, because of my frustration at how difficult it was to shop by this very important criteria.

The realm of carefully curated wardrobes is expanding. We’re peeling off from fast fashion indulgences and moving toward an industry that meticulously assembles timeless collections. Where luxury has previously been an exclusive and unattainable ideal, it’s now coming into light as the new standard.

And pioneering this movement is Maria Gangemi, co-founder of M.Gemi footwear. Not only is she continuously on the cutting edge of style, she simultaneously challenges norms of the trade with her commitment to handcrafted excellence. So, today is an introduction to this brand, their process, and what’s being done to #makesomeroom in our closets.

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This year for me, less was more when it came to Fashion Week. In previous years, we have run all over town to every show at New York Fashion Week, and it is exhausting, and truthfully, it leaves my mind spinning. Our approach this year was to take on much less and really try to connect with what we were experiencing.

Below are five inspiring ideas from this year’s New York Fashion Week. The idea is to find something easy that the average woman can do to up her style game this year.

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Kit and Ace is a technical cashmere company sourcing the softest wool from Mongolia and bridging the gap between luxury and everyday apparel. Co-founder Shannon Wilson envisioned a sophisticated fabric that met the needs of comfort and functionality. Along with her stepson, JJ, Shannon brought her passion to life with expert design, modern creativity, and approachable pieces.

Kit and Ace is more than a brand; it’s a lifestyle celebrating the unique influencers who wear their label. We recently had the splendid opportunity of connecting with Shannon and hearing snippets of Kit and Ace’s history, successes of the present, and innovation for their future.

To say the fashion industry is trend-based is an understatement. Trends come and go – whether clothing styles or “it” girls or even business models – so quickly that it is hard even for people who work in fashion to keep up. The newest trend in the industry, however, may catch some by surprise.

A bit unexpected: The concept of closing the clothing loop through recycling, donation and various other models is now the trend du jour for brands. From bigger retailers such as H&M, Madewell, and Patagonia to newer direct-to-consumer brands such as Reformation, M. Gemi, and yours truly – Cuyana — companies are driving increasing awareness of programs that leverage used clothing  as a source of regeneration and offering rewards to do so.

Here we go — flinging open the closet door to pick out the outfit. I mean, the outfit. The outfit that gives insight to a potential employer, insight to knowing who you are.

Are you meticulous? How about creative? Innovative? Passionate? Perfect for this position? The list of possible impressions goes on and on, and so do your thoughts of all the ways your favorite shirt can be interpreted, and misinterpreted, and interpreted again.

These thoughts are justified, as Mike Bell from Tilson, a human resource solutions company, stresses “the way the person being interviewed presents him or herself is vital to making a great first impression … You only get one chance to make a first impression.”