California’s low desert, where both Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley are located, continues to enjoy a resurgence in popularity it hasn’t seen since the 1940s and ‘50s, when the area became the getaway destination for Hollywood’s elite. Today, the crowds drawn to Palm Springs are still of a glamorous, upscale nature, but there’s a new ‘it’ destination in the area drawing a hipster crowd away from the low desert and out to the high.

Adele wins. We know this. Her effortless voice, the way her songs take up camp in the teensiest crevices of our soul, and on top of it all, she keeps a down-to-earth vibe that isn’t afraid to have a little fun.

So, when we came across this ballet — another form of art where talent holds us completely captivated — set to the tune of her latest album, we knew we had to share. These dancers are incredibly skilled, seriously in sync … and now we’re off to practice a few pliés.

Watch the piece in full, below.

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Winter, summer, spring … When is wine not a compliment to whatever it is (in whatever season of life) that we’re celebrating?

For those of us who love to pop a bottle, but who also may be a little intimidated as to which bottles of wines are actually worth popping, never fear. We’ve recently discovered Barrel + Ink, a San Francisco-based wine company that pairs winemaker with designer to bring limited-run, uniquely-yet-beautifully labeled bottles right to your doorstep.

Because when in doubt, you always pick a bottle by its label. Right? Read on for more …

A glassware company that produces striking hand blown carafes and glasses, Bib & Sola offers a stylish and conscious alternative to plastic bottles. The brand’s founder, Kira Heuer, is adamant about reducing plastic waste and providing clean water solutions. Through Bib & Sola’s colorful pieces, she aims to do both, believing that their beauty has more power to inspire education and change than anything else — a concept she calls, “Aesthetic Activism.”

We recently had the chance to connect with Kira and learn more about Bib & Sola’s story, its Aesthetic Activism campaign, and the difference that using glass instead of plastic can make.

We’re all artists in our own way. Sometimes, we just need some help getting in the zone, especially living amidst so much distraction, noise, and technology. We’ve recently discovered Sonia Mandeville, of So Sonia on YouTube, and are smitten. She’s not your average vlogger. She’s a 17-year-old creative filmmaker, writer, and visual artist from Jakarta, Indonesia who travels the world to gain inspiration for her art.

In fact, this is what Rainn Wilson, beloved actor and founder of SoulPancake, had to say about her when we asked …

Crawling through commuter gridlock, I caught the infectious strains of Houndmouth’s folk rock tribute to the red rock city of Sedona: Hey Little Hollywood / You’re gone but you’re not forgot / You got the cash but your credit’s no good / You flipped the script and you shot the plot. Less than a year later, I quit my job in entertainment law, vacated my Los Angeles apartment, and hightailed it into Arizona.

Sedona earned its nickname “Little Hollywood” as the prime filming location for golden age Westerns starring the likes of John Wayne, Hedy Lamarr, and Joan Crawford. Today the city remains a hub of culture, clean eating, outdoor adventure, spiritual healing, golf retreats, wineries, and specialty shopping.

Here’s how to make the most of your time in Sedona:

International Women’s Day is meant to celebrate and encourage women to achieve their ambitions, call for gender-balanced leadership, to value differences, and to develop more inclusion and flexibility across the globe. In short, it’s meant to create room for more women to create their own kind of beauty in the world. That’s why we thought it would be inspiring to have Chelsea Neman, of LA’s Tappan Collective (which recently opened in Platform in Culver City), share her thoughts on a few women who are doing just that.

Aiming to change the way emerging artists connect with their collectors, Chelsea co-founded Tappan to support emerging artists by sharing their work through e-commerce, crafting digital contexts, and a recently-opened physical space in Los Angeles. Chelsea believes that, “artists can show people something they otherwise may never see. They have the ability to change the way we think about our lives and the world we live in. Being an artist is a brave venture, and it gives me great joy to be able to support their careers.”

Who are a few of these female artists you should know? Read on to find out. 

There’s a jar sitting on my desk with dull pencils and writing pens branching different directions like flower stems. I grab one when I want to write, sometimes in the early morning before a long day in the office or late at night when everyone is sleeping. This simple glass holds my growing boldness, proclaiming, “I am a writer.” For many this statement is arrogant because if anyone claims to be an artist in any way, they must hold court in concert halls across the globe, have their work housed in world-famous museums, or make the New York Times bestseller list.

I don’t retract or make apologies though— I am a writer— because of that, I am also an artist. Perhaps you are, too. If you want to declare yourself as one but feel uncertain, then here are three reasons why you should (even if you’ve never sold a painting).

Autumn brings a focus that breathes new life into even the most simple of tasks. As we put away our summer clothes and reach for layers and scarves, we may also prepare for the beginning of the school year, a new job, or a renewed creative vision.

It’s in these moments that we begin to push past fear and embrace the work and creativity our day may bring.

It can be frightening to express ourselves, particularly when we attempt to generate income in the process. In step with the fresh feelings of autumn, maybe refreshing our minds with beautiful words will inspire a clear focus as we go into fall.

It might seem like a trap, thinking that happiness can be found only if picturesque ideals on a board come true. Reality can sometimes disappoint, so it’s possible that those ideas may never come to fruition.

Disappointment is scary, isn’t it? It settles in like a cat, heavy on your chest, and suddenly you forget what it feels like to hope and to dream because you’re just trying to breathe through unmet expectations.

It’s this fear of disappointment that had me rolling my eyes when others would decide to make vision boards. Unlike them, I was afraid of casting vision for my future because I was afraid that the things I longed for might never happen.

When I walked into the Sistine Chapel, I never imagined I’d walk out believing in God.

I never could have imagined it because I had never really wanted to believe in God. “Believers” had always seemed so boring to me, so vanilla, like they wore orthopedic shoes and followed all the rules. I wanted a life of kaleidoscope color and I was certain (or was until this moment) that God had nothing to offer me.