SoulPancake + Darling Present: Power and Purpose

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We’ve teamed up with SoulPancake yet again to discuss what it means to bring femininity to the workplace. Do women need to become like men in order to achieve power and status? Are there ways we can be unique leaders in the world without dismissing or being ashamed of our gender?

We hope you enjoy.

Where do you get your power and purpose? How do you embrace being a woman in your career?

This post is brought to you by the Darling Team! To learn more about who we are, please visit our Meet Our Team page.

8 COMMENTS
  • Lisa February 21, 2014

    Love this conversation so much! It’s something I’ve done a lot of thought and research on. I really believe women can change gender norms in the workplace by embracing a feminine appearance. It’s definitely a great place to start and something I strive to exude in my career. For more: http://fashiondiplomacy.wordpress.com/2013/04/13/why-women-not-men/

  • Sheri February 19, 2014

    Can you tell us the author and title of the poem read at the end of the video? It is wonderful.

  • Lyn February 14, 2014

    What is equal? And why has the conversation about equal been the same for the last thirty eight (plus) years?

    Until and unless we let go of “equal”, things will never change.

  • Stephanie Fisher February 13, 2014

    It find it incredible how much fashion and clothing dictate the power/influence conversation. As a dairy farmer, I spend my days working with and managing men, and this issue of power and influence manifests in the most fundamental and physical way. It’s a constant struggle to maintain influence in an historically male-dominated lifestyle. THANK YOU Golriz for bringing up Sheryl Sandberg’s sentiment of girls being called “bossy” or “bitchy” for being assertive. Such an important differentiation. And finally, “It’s never good to be the only person good at what you do…” – amazing. Thanks for posting.

  • Elisa February 13, 2014

    I’m not clear on what the orgasm comment (at 4:50) has to do with being kind towards other women and being equal in the workplace…could someone explain how this ties in with the rest of the video, please? …I’m willing to learn.

    • Julie February 15, 2014

      Elisa,

      I think the point was that there’s enough pleasure and love for all women. We compete in a masculine world, many women compete for men, we lock our sexuality away to be more like men or we use it to please them to get ahead of other women. This, of course, is highly generalized. But I think her comment was to make a point about how sexuality does play into gender equality and kindness towards women. Just my thoughts. Hope this helps!

    • Elisa February 20, 2014

      Hello again! I don’t really know why I’m posting this…I could just write another post on my blog about these sentiments 🙂

      I was pondering Julie’s response this evening {while cooking and shoveling snow:) } and began to realize that I was really struck by the reality of sex being used as a tool of manipulation in the workplace–to get ahead of other women or to convince a man perhaps to ‘choose’ one woman over another. I must be rather naive, but this was new information for me. I think now I will better understand some of my friend’s conversations. I can’t help but wonder if there is another twist that this concept of sex as a means to an end could take.

      When I hear about women using sex to get what they want, rather than to honor the love and connection between themselves and their partners, it really reminds me of sex-trafficking. Pimps sell women’s services to make money. It’s a form of sex as a means to an end. Really the only difference I see is that one of these groups of women arguably has a choice, the other, arguably, does not. This is a generalization, of course.

      As women in universities, medical facilities, in the market place and beyond, could we choose to honor our struggling sisters with making wiser choices in purity and modesty? Rather than being focused on being kind to those around us and in our direct spheres of influence, could we also choose not to cater to these methods of using sex as manipulation, in order to take a stand for our sisters the world over who may have never been granted the choice of whether they wanted to be used for sex or not?

      The value of sexual integrity is often mistaken for weakness. It is indeed, in itself, a tool for physical health, emotional health and spiritual well being, and it is a way to bless others–To not exploit our freedom, but to use it wisely and preciously. And to honor those whose freedom has been stripped away. To stand in solidarity with them.

      Until women the world over are free and equal to their male counterparts, our job here is yet unfinished.

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