I think we can all agree that the older we get the more we realize just how much our mothers had to put up with while raising us. From chauffeuring us to tennis lessons and dental appointments to bearing with our adolescent angst and taking care of us when sick, it seems like there’s nothing our moms weren’t willing to do for us.

For many, our moms remain our number one fan, and our relationship with them will forever be one of the strongest bonds we have. Yet, as influential as mothers are in our lives, how often do we stop and actually let them know what they mean to us? Chances are, not enough.

Whether we wish we could serve the poor and alleviate suffering like Mother Teresa or pioneer critical scientific research like Marie Curie, we all dream of doing beautiful, world-changing things with our lives. Yet, no matter how much we might long to follow in the footsteps of such women, who in fact believes themselves capable of that kind of greatness?

Perhaps we can imagine ourselves doing so in the future — when we are “older and wiser” — but in our present, imperfect condition? Hardly.

A glassware company that produces striking hand blown carafes and glasses, Bib & Sola offers a stylish and conscious alternative to plastic bottles. The brand’s founder, Kira Heuer, is adamant about reducing plastic waste and providing clean water solutions. Through Bib & Sola’s colorful pieces, she aims to do both, believing that their beauty has more power to inspire education and change than anything else — a concept she calls, “Aesthetic Activism.”

We recently had the chance to connect with Kira and learn more about Bib & Sola’s story, its Aesthetic Activism campaign, and the difference that using glass instead of plastic can make.

As women, one of our greatest collective fears seems to be the fear of growing older. I mean, be honest: When was the last time someone you know actually looked forward to their 30th birthday? I’m only 24 years old and yet I’ve already been told numerous times by others that I should be using anti-wrinkle creams, exercising diligently, etc. in order to hold onto my youth for as long as possible. In their words, “it’s all downhill from here.”

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As much as we all want to be confident, self-assured women, there’s a nagging little voice inside our head that tries to tell us we can’t be — that we’re inadequate, we’re weak, we’re unworthy. It’s one thing to be aware of our shortcomings, but quite another to be self-critical and demeaning toward ourselves because of them.

When we notice our thoughts becoming less than kind and supportive toward ourselves, though, what can we do? How do we banish self-doubt and manifest the strong women that we are?

As someone who grew up in Minnesota and now lives in southern California, I’ve experienced winter in all of its forms — from harsh blizzards to mild rains to full-on heat waves. Yet, there are some aspects of this season that remain consistent no matter what part of the nation we reside in. Whether we live on snow-capped mountains or along sandy beaches, we all experience shorter evenings, lower average temperatures, and a subtle sense of pause around us.

Animals rest in hibernation, nature’s colors fade, and we, too, are invited to take on a slower, more peaceful pace. There is no better time for quiet reflection, for hopeful dreaming, and for all the best comforts of home. Whether we prefer to remain indoors and keep cozy or get outside and explore, there are countless opportunities to savor this season.

For a few ideas on how to get started, below is our winter bucket list. See how many you can check off!

To err is human. We’ve all doubtless heard this phrase before, but in spite of its truth, who among us doesn’t still cling to a desire to achieve perfection, to become the people we were created to be? We all have dreams of becoming the best, truest version of ourselves; we want to be as kind, as generous, or as compassionate as possible, and we want to manifest such qualities in a manner that’s reflective of our distinct selves.

Examining our lives and becoming more of who we are, however, is easier said than done. While we can look to role models and other women to show us how to live well, the fact that each of us has never existed before and will never exist again means that no one else can quite show us who we are as individuals or who we were born to be.

If we are to live as our truest selves, we must become something we alone know.

For many Americans, the first Monday of September marks the end of summer, the start of school, and a much-anticipated day away from the office. It’s a designated time of rest and relaxation, filled with weekend road trips, neighborhood barbecues, and countless shopping sales. Yet beyond these, Labor Day has a deeper significance and history, which when understood, can add a new dimension to our celebrations.

“Labor Day differs in every essential way from the other holidays of the year in any country,” said Samuel Gompers, founder of the American Federation of Labor. “Labor Day … is devoted to no man, living or dead, to no sect, race, or nation.”

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Whether we’re afraid of public speaking, spiders, the death of a loved one, or something more unusual, we all hold on to certain fears that we resist facing. It’s natural to shrink from them, and some fears – like spiders – are just plain hard to be proactive about conquering.

Others, however, stem from half-truths we believe about ourselves or a situation, and they’re something we can work on.

Spring may have officially begun in March, but in many parts of the country, it feels as though the season is only just beginning.

The air is gradually warming up, the birds are chirping once more, and green buds are starting to emerge from the earth. It’s a season of renewal and rebirth, a time of cleansing and transformation, and one that is perfect for slowing down and celebrating life with a revived sense of awe and wonder. How to stop and enjoy each moment?

Below, we’re listing 25 of our favorite ways to savor the season.